• “Watch your damn mouth”

    image provided by Lauren the cartoon goddess

    There was a multi-viewpoint editorial in the New York Times about swearing. Not just swearing in general, but by “educated people.” The premise of the editorial was that it is incumbent upon “educated people” to know better than to foul their speech with such low-down, inappropriate filth. Not a new argument. I know that somewhere along the way I’ve run across someone reciting that quote about profanity being the failure of vocabulary. As an educated person (two degrees, thanks for asking), and someone who falls on the “in favor of” side of the argument (perhaps you’ve read my previous posts?), I have to ask- “what’s the big freak’in deal bitch?”
     

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    All that glitters doesn’t have to be gold: a few films that got lost in the shuffle

    oneoutofmany

    I don’t know what the guidelines are for Academy voters. Has this movie pushed the medium forward? Does it have something to say? Will it stand the test of time? Is it worth revisiting? Actually, I don’t think there are any guidelines. I think there are just a lot of Academy members with ballots sitting in front of them and the only question guiding their decision is “which did you like best?” Although, with the way things have shaken out I’m not even sure that is the case.

    By the time you read this the chips will have fallen where they may, and this small bit of speculation will either cast the results in a new light, confirm your suspicions, or be completely meaningless. Reality TV has shown itself to be largely, if not completely, contrived. The pretense that it’s real makes it more compelling. Why can’t it work the other way? Why can’t reality be contrived? There are some very tantalizing potential outcomes hanging in the balance. Not least of which is Kathryn Bigelow making history as the first woman to win best director, and at the same time besting her ex, James Cameron. Everyone likes a good story, and I’m sure a lot of Academy voters would love to help write this one: sister did it for herself!
    I saw “The Hurt Locker.” It’s okay, it doesn’t excel. As a movie, and directorial effort, “Point Break” was much better. Though should Bigelow, win I can’t say it’s underserved. There isn’t exactly a pack of heavy hitters going up against her. Remember when “There Will Be Blood” went up against “No Country for Old Men?” That was a horse race. To be perfectly honest, I don’t care much about the Oscars. What I do care about are movies that deserve attention, that can really mean something to people, being ignored and forgotten. Here are just a few from this year that would be worth your time:

     

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    That’s NOT my face

    beforeAfter_4

    Written by Petite Anglaise

    I’m EXTREMELY hesitant to write this article, but I feel with the onslaught of vanity piercing our society, who better to raise awareness of marketing’s aesthetic appeal then an art school graduate. Looking back at previous years in fashion, the tides have turned immensely.  From praise of the heroin chic statues and Euro born and bred models (think Kate Moss in her hey day) to utter disdain of these WASP clothe hangers. Even with the vibrant range of hues showcased in the collections and marketing schemes of the biggest monopolies, most visible are the absent variations of skin tones and unique features that characterize each human being.
     

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    Confucion

    say what?

    So I’m eating some Pei Wei last night and I go for a fortune cookie; partly out of habit/tradition, partly because I was hoping for some cheap words of encouragement. I open the thing and, after quickly noting the Chinese characters for “gift” and my lucky lotto numbers, I find this proverb-“A great man never ignores the simplicity of a child.”

    Please let my worst misgivings about human nature come to nothing

    Please let my worst misgivings about human nature come to nothing

    [/caption]Hmmmm, you know, sometimes the rays of clarity can’t break through the vague cloudbanks because there’s no sun to begin with. There’s only so much room to operate in the field of tentative statements, and “specificity” is a dirty word, but this was ridiculous. My mind immediately assumed the worst: great men recognize an opportunity when they see one? “Never give a sucker an even break?” No, this was one of those “when really, he’s teaching us” kind of things. There was just something about the way it was worded that I couldn’t let go of. Why bring “great men” into it? Why not just “never ignore the simplicity of a child?” Was an appeal being made here? Why “ignore?” It was probably just an odd translation, but it drove me up the wall, and to scour the internet to call bullshit on other faux pearls. You can find some downright inscrutable sayings in a reckless tour of Asian wisdom. “Add legs to the snake after you have finished drawing it.” Your guess is as good as mine. Since it’s a picture you drew you have already made it your own, so make it anything you want it to be? Here’s another “proverb”(trust me, it needs quotes) complete with translation, elucidation, and correction found on Wikipedia:

    “yi ren chi bao, quan jia bu ji”

    o Literally: If a single member of a family eats, the whole family will not feel hungry.

    o Meaning: The whole family consists of only one person, usually referring to the one not yet married.

    o Common Misunderstanding: If one person in the family is happy, the whole family is happy.

     

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    Who Watched The Watchmen.

    Worthington’s review of Zack Snyder and Warner Bros.’ adaptation of the acclaimed WATCHMEN limited comic series.

    Loyalty is an unwieldy double-edged sword. On the one hand there seems to be nothing more virtuous than adhering to bonds, unspoken or otherwise, to one’s own principles, kin, or comrades. On the other, what do you do when your loyalty to one conflicts with loyalty to another, thus forcing you to take action? Where does that leave you? Are you disloyal for choosing one over the other? Or are you merely weak, unable to find a solution that refuses to compromise? The burden of its inherent irony can be staggering.

    Such is the dilemma faced by the ensemble cast of heroes of the much-loved and critically celebrated graphic novel Watchmen. From the virtuous yet ruthless gumshoe heroics of the masked (but not hidden) Rorschach to the moral quandaries proposed by the existence and actions of the supermen Doctor Manhattan and Ozymandias, Watchmen offers a tantalizing glimpse into a world that never was, but came all too close to having been.

     

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    6 Bests of The Moment | New York Fashion Week

    Now that New York Fashion Week is officially over, (and we’re glad it’s done), it is now time for reflection over what we just saw…or didn’t see.  You see, we’re all the way here on the West Coast where fashion exists but it doesn’t exist to the extent where the whole city will halt and devote a whole week to it (Note: we did have a Fashion Week that ultimately failed.)  That is why we appreciate The Moment’s coverage of New York Fashion Week.  They put their blog on overdrive and we’re inundated, in a good way, with all things fashion.  Also, they handle themselves professionally and make the readers feel like fashion insiders as opposed to teenage fashion interns who type in all caps, “OMG! I’m inside the Miss Sixty show!  Aren’t you jelly?!?!”  So we decided to post our favorites of The Moment blog’s fashion week commentary.

    1. Photo of The Moment: Ralph Lauren

    [Photo by Eric Ray Davidson for The Moment]

    Have you ever heard of fashion bloggers calling Karl Lagerfeld “Uncle Karl?”  Have you ever heard of Stephen Colbert call Bill O’Reilly “Papa Bear?”  Well Ralph Lauren is our Papa Bear.  I guess that makes us Lo Heads.

    2. The Fashion Telex | Brian Reyes

    [Words by Horatio Silva]

    We love any good story about model spills on the runway.  It’s almost like FML without the overbearing feeling that life is not worth living anymore.  Suck it up, models.  It’s not the end of the world and at the end of the day, people still treat you better compared to to the rest of society.

     

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    Super Bowl Logo and Obama Logo Suspiciously Similar

    Before The Super Bowl XLIII hype becomes old news, does anyone else see it besides me? Am I seeing things?  I know that the President’s team didn’t invent the view-into-the-horizon perspective but this strikes me as peculiar. Seriously, how much money can be made off of Obama’s branding. Can they sell commemorative plates for the next 8 years?

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    Fast backward in time

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